When tomorrow dawns, so will Anzac Day: a day of memorial where the armed forces of Australia and New Zealand are honoured for their service to country encapsulated by one specific event in World War 1, the 1915 invasion of the Gallipoli Peninsula in the Aegean Sea. This year Covid-19 will ensure that no marches will occur, no massed crowds at ceremonies hearing the Last Post, no gatherings at Returned Services League clubs and pubs—only simple reflection as families remain indoors or offer a salute from their driveways or retirement villages. But this year’s commemoration holds a lesson unsurpassed since World War 1 and World War 2. Gallipoli marks a politically driven defeat in which the Anzac’s finest soldiers were sacrificed to the murderous…